Urology

Advanced, efficient urological assessment

Urology CLEARLY DEFINED
We provide systems which deliver performance, reliability and image quality, according to your requirements. These systems incorporate colour flow and pulsed Doppler in the standard package for complete vascular assessment. A wide range of transducers, including simultaneous Bi-Plane, mono-plane, dedicated brachy-, cryo-therapy probes and laparoscopes extend the imaging experience. Efficient transducer design ensures thorough sterilisation, in accordance with statutory guidelines. Comprehensive urology measurement and calculation packages are standard. Advanced technology options provide additional insight, including Real-time Tissue Elastography (RTE), Real-time Virtual Sonography (RVS), 3D and Transluminal Imaging.

Convex

C251
C251
C252
C252
C253
C253
EUP-C715
EUP-C715
UST-9102U-3.5
UST-9102U-3.5
UST-9133
UST-9133

Linear

L55
L55
L64
L64
EUP-L74M
EUP-L74M
UST-568
UST-568
UST-5417
UST-5417
UST-5712
UST-5712

Endocavity

C41B
C41B
CC41R1
CC41R1
CL4416R
CL4416R
C41L47RP
C41L47RP
R41R
R41R
R41RL
R41RL
C41RP
C41RP
CC41R
CC41R
C41V1
C41V1
EUP-R54AW-19
EUP-R54AW-19
EUP-R54AW-33
EUP-R54AW-33
EUP-CC531S
EUP-CC531S
UST-672-5/7.5
UST-672-5/7.5
UST-675P
UST-675P
UST-676P
UST-676P
UST-678
UST-678

3D/4D

VC41V
VC41V

4G CMUT

SML44
SML44

Biopsy/Intraoperative

C22K
C22K
C22P
C22P
C25P
C25P
L43K
L43K
L44LA
L44LA
EUP-B512
EUP-B512
EUP-B715
EUP-B715
EUP-OL334
EUP-OL334
UST-5045P-3.5
UST-5045P-3.5
UST-9135P
UST-9135P

Shear Wave Measurement (SWM)
SWM incorporates a reliability indicator, VsN, from which the precision and reproducibility of the median shear wave speed measurement can be assessed. Combinational use of SWM and RTE is now achievable with one transducer, to gain a better understanding of the tissue elasticity.
Real-time Tissue Elastography (RTE)
Tissue-hardening causes loss of elasticity. RTE calculates this loss and overlays the B-Mode image with colour. Rigid structures are displayed in blue, while the more elastic structures are in red. Clinical trials have shown RTE to offer enormous potential in visualising prostate cancer and significantly improving the role of image-guided biopsies.
Prostate brachytherapy
Brachytherapy is an established technique in treating the early stages of prostate cancer requiring high resolution transrectal imaging. Two types of brachytherapy are available, permanent low-dose radiation (LDR) and temporary high-dose radiation (HDR) both of which require ultrasound guidance. The EUP-U533 is an electronic bi-plane transducer incorporating a convex array for the transverse plane and a linear array for the sagittal plane facilitating accurate volume measurements, precise seed loading and positioning, with additional colour-flow capabilities.
Prostate cryotherapy
This emerging technology offers promising results in cases of radiation failure or with higher-risk patients with prostate cancer. As cells freeze, ice crystals form and the freeze/thaw process destroys cells through a cyclical process of direct freezing, dehydration and hypoxia. As the prostate gland is subjected to -40°C, an anti-tumour response is activated, producing antibodies which assist in eradicating the tumour. Optimal bi-plane ultrasound offers transverse and linear prostate imaging for accurate cryoneedle and rod placement. Colour flow offers valuable information of the vascularity within the rectal wall during the procedure.
Kidney cryotherapy
Cryotherapy is a potential treatment for small renal tumours (up to 4cm) and involves inserting ultra-thin cryoneedles into the tumour during laparoscopy. As Argon gas passes through the cryoneedle, the tip of the needle cools and forms an ice ball which engulfs the tumour and destroys the tissue. A significant advancement in renal cryosurgery is the ability to perform real-time ultrasound monitoring of the ice-ball demonstrating a very close correlation between the final gross measurement and the ultrasound measurement of the lesion. Ultrasound monitoring is essential to guarantee safe and effective cryoablation. The OL-334 is a highly flexible laparoscopic transducer with omnidirectional capabilities, adjusted and angulated to optimise coupling with the kidney. Colour Doppler provides a significant contribution to complete vascular mapping throughout the procedure.
http://www.galil-medical.com/

  1. Aigner F, Mitterberger M, Rehder P, et al. Status of transrectal ultrasound imaging of the prostate. J Endourol. 2010 May;24(5):685-91.
  2. Ferrari FS., Scorzelli A., Megliola A. et al. Real-time elastography in the diagnosis of prostate tumor. Journal of Ultrasound (2009) 12, 22-31
  3. Havre R.F., Elde E., Gilja O.H., et al. Freehand real-time elastography: impact of scanning parameters on image quality and in vitro intra- and interobserver validations. Ultrasound Med Biol. 2008 Oct;34(10):1638-50.
  4. Hendrikx, J.M. et al. The use of endoluminal ultrasonography for preventing significant bleeding during endopyelotomy: evaluation of helical computed tomography vs endoluminal ultrasonography for detecting crossing vessels. BJU International, 2006; 97(4): 786-789
  5. Kamoi K., Okihara K., Ochiai A., et al. The utility of transrectal real-time elastography in the diagnosis of prostate cancer. Ultrasound in Med. and Biol. 2008; 34(7):1025-1032
  6. Miyanaga N., Akaza H., Yamakawa M., et al. Tissue elasticity imaging for diagnosis of prostate cancer: a preliminary report. Int J Urol. 2006 Dec;13(12):1514-8.
  7. Miyagawa T., Tsutsumi M., Matsumura T., et al. Real-time elastography for the diagnosis of prostate cancer: evaluation of elastographic moving images. Japanese Journal of Clinical Oncology Advance Access published April 9, 2009
  8. Pallwein L., Mitterberger M., Pinggera G., et al. Sonoelastography of the prostate: comparison with systematic biopsy findings in 492 patients. Eur J Radiol. 2008 Feb;65(2):304-10
  9. Pallwein L., Mitterberger M., Struve P., et al. Comparison of sonoelastography guided biopsy with systematic biopsy: impact on prostate cancer detection. Eur Radiol. 2007 Sep;17(9):2278-85
  10. Pallwein L., Mitterberger M., Gradl J., et al. Value of contrast-enhanced ultrasound and elastography in imaging of prostate cancer. Curr Opin Urol. 2007 Jan;17(1):39-47.
  11. Pallwein L., Mitterberger M., Struve P., et al. Real-time elastography for detecting prostate cancer: preliminary experience. BJU Int. 2007 Jul;100(1):42-6
  12. Pallwein L., Mitterberger M., Pelzer A., et al. Ultrasound of prostate cancer: recent advances. Eur Radiology 2008 Apr;18(4):707-15
  13. Pallwein L., Aigner F., Faschingbauer R., et al. Prostate cancer diagnosis: value of real-time elastography. Abdom Imaging. 2008 Nov-Dec;33(6):729-35. Review
  14. Salomon G., Köllerman J., Thederan I., et al. Evaluation of prostate cancer detection with ultrasound real-time elastography: a comparison with step section pathological analysis after radical prostatectomy. Eur Urol. 2008 Dec;54(6):1354-62
  15. Sumura M., Shigeno K., Hyuga T., et al. Initial evaluation of prostate cancer with real-time elastography based on step-section pathologic analysis after radical prostatectomy: a preliminary study. Int J Urol. 2007 Sep;14(9):811-6.
  16. Tsutsumi M., Miyagawa T., Matsumura T., et al. The impact of real-time tissue elasticity imaging (elastography) on the detection of prostate cancer: clinicopathological analysis. Int J Clin Oncol. 2007 Aug; 12(4):250-5. Epub 2007 Aug 20.
  17. Tsutsumi M., Miyagawa T., Matsumura T., et al. Real-time balloon inflation elastography for prostate cancer detection and initial evaluation of clinicopathologic analysis. Am J Roentgenol. 2010 Jun;194(6):W471-6.